Past Exhibitions

 

II/2017

Room - Klaus Lehmann and Olaf Holzapfel

Klaus Lehmann was born in 1927 in Berlin and died in 2016 in Erbach. As he turned seventy – just around the time when one millenium was tipping over into another – he discovered a new freedom as an artist. It led him to a form of ceramics where the objects stand alone, withdrawing from any kind of decorative function and confronting the viewer with a profound austerity whose attraction lies in the enigma of its concentrated intensity. Lehmann is still little known except by connoisseurs, and this exhibition, for the first time, provides a retrospective of his later work in his native city, Berlin. His estate is administered by the Galerie Angelika Metzger.
 

Olaf Holzapfel was born in Görlitz in 1969 and now lives and works in Berlin. He exhibited at this year's Documenta in Athens and Kassel with two installations. His six-metre long painting, "Lauf" (an ambiguous, complex word in German which here can perhaps best be translated as “progression” or “subsequence”) stands out with its highly complex abstract construction. It features monochrome surfaces, sequences of curves, seemingly three-dimensional cuboid shapes, fine lines, vertical and horizontal compositions of diagonal lines, connectivity and fracturing.

 

II/2017

Roof - Cat and Bird in Peace

with works by David Claerbout (the author of the video that gives this exhibition its name), Martin Creed, H.P.Feldmann, Katharina Fritsch, Francesco Gennari, Piero Golia, Beate Kuhn, Cornelius Quabeck, Wiebke Siem
 

In the heritage-listed attic space, a zoo is opening, an opportunity to marvel at animals in a variety of artistic contexts. This menagerie includes works with a metaphysical and metaphorical dimension, but also works that reveal a striking humour or are emotionally attractive.

 

 
 

Photos: Holger Niehaus

 
 
 
 

Past Exhibitions

 

I/2017

Room - Spheres

The idea for this exhibition came from three sources: the Spheres trilogy by Peter Sloterdijk, which has constantly inspired me since its release; discovering the work of Maria Bartuszova and Beate Kuhn; and the book Architektonische Spekulationen by Rolf Wedewer and Thomas Kempas from the year 1970, which enthralled me as an architecture student back then. In my mind’s eye, this was the merging of philosophy, art and architecture into a utopian representation and vision of today’s intellectual and artistic energies.  

 
 

Photos: Holger Niehaus

 

 
 
 

I/2017

Roof - Robert Sturm

The works of Robert Sturm (b. 1935 in Bad Elster, d. 1994 in Fulda) are among the most significant postwar manifestations between ceramics and sculpture. His ceramic sculptures from 1960 onwards featured constructivist abstraction. However, his works, strongly marked by fragmentation and stony weathered surfaces, testify less to new beginnings and optimism than to skepticism towards the “brokenness of the world in which we live” (Sturm). The forms, surfaces and colors of his objects are imbued with heaviness, suffering and darkness. These themes were later intensified in figurative subjects like torso and head.

 
 

Photos: Holger Niehaus